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Desert Indians and the Pinyon Pines

The pinyon pine was one of the most important plants used by desert Indians. To collect the seeds, they would beat the green cones off the branches, then place the cones in a fire. The heat would cause the cones to open and expose the seeds, which had been roasted in the process. The food value of the single-leaf pinyon nut equals or exceeds that of many commercial nuts. Pine pitch made excellent glue for waterproofing baskets and repairing broken pots, and the wood was used for construction and cooking.


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Open pinyon cones



Pinyon pine (Pinus monophylla)


ecology: wildlife - plants - geography: places - MAPS - roads & trails: route 66 - old west - communities - weather - book store
ghost towns - gold mines - parks & public lands: wilderness - native culture - history - geology: natural features - glossary - comments

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